Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Trackside Treasure First Anniversary

One year ago I started blogging Trackside Treasure for three reasons. One, it sounded simple. Even with minimal programming skills, each post is easy to produce. Two, it sounded profitable. Oh sure, maybe if the blog gets 10,000 visits per day. Three, I had something to blog about. Fortunately, I'm nowhere close to running out of material.

Looking backwards, from a marker lamp's perspective, I've learned that it's important to stay on-message, continuing to publish unique material that's different from anything else online. Unlike most blogs, mine is not a true daily "web log"; instead I take some time to pace my posts so the blog won't burn out. I really appreciate comments that readers send, keeping the blog interactive. Thanks to Dave, Steve, Byron, Robert, Chris, Jason, John and Scott who produce the fine blogs and websites you'll see on my blogroll.

There is a lot of interest in Canadian railway operations of the 1970's-80's-90's, as evidenced by the average of 25 daily visits to Trackside Treasure. Even though Canada isn't as broad in scope or locales as US railroading, I've encountered lots of Canadian operations I'd like to share.

Thanks to you, the loyal readers of Trackside Treasure. I hope you'll stay aboard for another interesting year. Who knows what'll appear around the next curve?

Running extra...

Can you identify either specific location pictured in this post? The first reader to do so and send it as a comment to this post will win the Trackside Treasure first anniversary prize pack.
...
Welcome John Longhurst, associate editor of Canadian Railway Modeller magazine, to our blogroll. John will be blogging about his CP Rail Manitoba & Minnesota Subdivision HO layout and all things model railway-related, not to mention Tibetan sand mandalas!

11 comments:

quba said...

I recently came accross your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I dont know what to

say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.


Patricia

http://lioneltrains.info

Eric said...

Thanks for your kind words, Patricia. Your blog also looks interesting for anyone interested in the world of Lionel. Happy blogging,
Eric

Anonymous said...

I check on this site when looking for rail news on the internet.

I also enjoy the history articles of 50-60-70-80-90's.
Having worked for he railway from 1967 to 1991.agentoperator.

Train Geek said...

Hi Eric. I like the format of your blog - focusing intently on a single topic per post, and putting a lot of effort into each post. You provide unique content on the web and I look forward to every post. Keep up the good work!

Eric said...

Thanks Reg and Steve for your comments about my corner of cyberspace, good to have you along. Steve, you've been busy documenting Winnipeg's rails since your move, so I trust you'll like my next post...
Eric

Oil-Electric said...

Eric! You bring a tear to this senior's eyes. Alas, a marker lamp. Too many don't know, and others could care less - but to me, that marks the end of a real train.

As kids, we eagerly awaited the crew car, anticipating a friendly wave. The hack was the end of the train, the period at the end of the sentence. The conclusion to noise and clatter. Imposing law and order on a string of unruly, undisciplined cars.

FRED is an impersonal mechanical/electrical contraption. Not capable of giving a friendly wave, a big smile. FRED flashes a cold, impersonal, red blink.

Eric said...

You're right Robert - the loss of markers was yet another indignity our trains have suffered. They left us gradually: first red lights, then reflectorized metal plates or red flags, (red construction flashers on VIA trains), then total removal of the caboose and arrival of SBU's. In my early railfanning days, I recorded "LOCOWA" and "CBWA" for each train (locomotive wave and caboose wave)!
Eric

Train Geek said...

At least the locomotive crew still waves, Eric!

Anonymous said...

I haven't stopped by in a while, but I'm always glad when I do. Keep it up, Eric.

BTW: I don't see anyone guessing on the two pictured locations. I have no idea where they are, but I'd guess the second one is near Kingston Mills?

Bryan

Eric said...

Thanks for your kind comments, Bryan. The correct guesses are in the post following this one. Hope you'll like some of the Kingston-related posts I'm currently working on.
Eric

Anonymous said...

Ah, I didn't see that. And to think that last night as I lay in bed I realized that first pic was from Belleville. Oh well, too late.

Bryan